In evidenza

Graduates in Europe, from education to work

Professor Francis Green of the Institute of Education and Centre for Global Higher Education in London analyses the phenomenon of graduatejobs and underemployment
09 August 2017

How has the demand for university graduates changed in Europe and how is it changing? What are the inequalities that are still present in the job market and how can they be overcome? How can different educational systems and economies with different degrees of development be harmonised? What scenarios await us in the near future?

In his presentation, Professor Francis Green of the Institute of Education and Centre for Global Higher Education in London analyses the phenomenon of graduatejobs and underemployment in the European environment.

 

 

"From 2004 to 2005, the proportion of university graduates in the population has increased, but graduatejobs, i.e., high-skilled jobs, did not grow in all countries at the same rate", Professor Green points out. "In fact, in southern Europe the share of low-skilled jobs grew more than in other European areas, while in the countries of continental Europe the employment structure appears somewhat more stable".

Consequently, even though the number of graduates will continue to increase, the future of jobs for them seems to be uncertain. According to Green, "The most likely scenario in the coming decade in most developed western countries, in the absence of a pervasive evolution in technology and a significant global economic recovery, will be an increase in underemployment, i.e., the number of graduates employed in jobs for non-graduates".

"But raising the level of education", says the Professor, "offers a number of benefits to society as a whole, benefits that are not limited to the work environment: more educated young people also show greater participation in civic life and politics, but also higher attention to nutrition and physical health".

 

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